THE HUMAN MANIFESTO

MANIFESTING SINCE FEBRUARY 27 AT 1:38 P.M.

Happy Birthday Kim Jong II

North Korea’s restrictions toward aid workers entering the country make it difficult to assess the conditions its citizens live in. Those who have escaped the repressive regime describe the brutalities “unmatched anywhere in the world.”

The DPRK forum, written by an American author who is studying about North Korea, provides an Associated Press story on the recent birthday celebrations for ruler Kim Jong II, noting the North Korean papers lacked of coverage on the nuclear standoff between the U.S. and North Korea.

The author wryly points out many children do not see another birthday.

No doubt he is having a grand time in one of his many palaces, but the people in his impoverished state may not live to see another birthday.

Probably no mention of the starving masses, the crumbling economy, the thousands perishing in labor camps, and the diversion of aid poured across the divide either. It is a happy day for Kim Jong Il, why ruin it? However, the regime did not miss a beat when complaining about others not holding their end of the deal despite Pyongyang’s unwillingness to keep their end of the bargain (a typical tactic):

Approximately, 600,000 people have died due to famine in North Korea as of Jan 2006 according to One Free Korea. And it’s not clear how many N. Koreans live within the sixteen known concentration camps.

On One Free Korea, posts a BCC video “Access of Evil” about North Korea’s “famed” Camp 22 to illustrate uncovered atrocities.

“This is the detention center,” he said. “If someone goes inside this building, in three months he will be dead or disabled for life. In this corner they decided about the executions, who to execute and whether to make it public.”

50,000 men, women and children are being held at Camp 22.

DPRK Studies (no relation to DPRK forum) assesses  North Korea will remain entangled in its oppressive bondage, until the death of Jong II.

Each blog revealed how it failed to educate its audience of the conditions of North Korea, and many heavily linked. This is not exclusive to these particular blogs, as I have found this a common theme in many “journalistic”-type blogs. Blogs are the next frontier where content cannot be limited by editorial decisions and motivated by advertisement.

It is only a matter of time before this power is harnessed for human freedom.

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This entry was posted on February 18, 2008 by in Uncategorized.
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